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TRIA Orthopaedic Center Your Cycling Blog

Physio Ball Training in Cycling

May 30, 2013

The physio ball or the Swiss ball has made inroads into almost every strength training program in every sport. Physio ball training helps increase balance and improve core strength at a lower intensity. For athletes just starting, the impacts are dramatic.  For the more seasoned athlete, the benefits are gained in 2-3 weeks of training but do not produce a higher level of performance beyond the initial gains.

Check out this post by Paul Rogers, a former Strength and Conditioning Coach for the Australian National Sprint Cycling Team.  For his team, he did not see any benefits of the Swiss ball during the time his team used the ball training method.

So what does this mean?  If you are looking to improve your performance on the bike, simply add other training methods to supplement the Swiss ball.  Do not make it the only method of training used during off-bike workouts over a long period of time.

Some examples of other training methods include:

  1. Dumbbell training on two feet
  2. Dumbbell training on one foot
  3. Bodyweight training
  4. Olympic lifts

To increase your performance, you must increase the stress you place on the body.  The ball does not provide enough stress to gain the benefits you desire by itself.  Therefore, supplement your training with the mentioned methods and you will see better numbers from your investment.

For more information, visit The McCarthy Project

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How to Recover After A Long Bike Ride

June 14, 2012

With the Menomonie Gran Fondo this past Saturday, we thought it would be nice to a deeper look at how you can recover once you are done with a ride like that.

By:  Jane Schwartz Harrison, RD, Nutritionist

MyOptumHealth.com

Congratulations! You just finished a long and challenging ride. But wait! Don’t abandon your nutrition needs just yet. The right mix of recovery foods will go a long way to helping you feel less sore, less stiff, and less tired in the hours and days that follow. A smart nutrition strategy includes a follow-up plan that will re-feed your glycogen stores and repair muscle tissue. Make sure you follow these five tips for prime recovery:

Timing Counts

The minutes immediately after you’re off the bike (when there is increased blood flow to your muscles) is when your body is most receptive to refueling.

  • Aim to eat within 15 to 30 minutes, and do not wait longer than 45 minutes.This is essential!
  • Then continue to eat at regular intervals for the next 24 hours to keep up replenishment.

Carbs Are Key, Protein Secondary

Carbs are the most important recovery nutrient. They stimulate the release of insulin, a hormone that helps build muscle and restock glycogen stores.

  • Aim for 1 to 1.5 grams of carb per kilogram of body weight in the first 45 minutes. Keep this up for about four hours after the event, or until you eat a larger meal.
  • For example, if you weigh 150 pounds, eat 70 to 100 grams of carbs per hour. One gram of carb has four calories, so that translates to about 300 to 400 calories of carbs as soon as possible after you get off the bike. You can break it up by having something 15 minutes after you stop, and again in another 15 to 30 minutes.
  • For the following 24 hours, your carb intake should be about six to 10 grams per kg of body weight (450-750 grams of carb for a 150 pound person).
  • Adding some protein to your carb can improve your recovery, but don’t overdo the protein (or fat) in the first couple hours, as that can slow the absorption of the carbs.

Smart Recovery Meal Ideas

Here are some meal/snack ideas that contain about 70 to 80 grams of carbs and eight to 15 grams of protein:

  • Large fruit smoothie made with milk or yogurt
  • Peanut butter sandwich and large carton of juice
  • Bagel and yogurt
  • 16 oz 100% juice and two ounces of low-fat cheese
  • Chocolate milk and a one or two granola bars
  • ¼ cup raisins, a large banana, and 16 oz. milk
  • Large baked potato and cottage cheese
  • Recovery drink with mostly carbs and nine to 10 grams of protein

Save higher protein intakes until at least two hours after the event. This could include chicken breast, fish, lean steak, high protein drink, etc.

Replace Fluids and Electrolytes

Replacing fluids lost by sweating is critical in order to prevent dehydration.

  • Your goal will be to drink on schedule during your ride and lose no more than 2 percent of your body weight (three pounds for a 150 pound person).
  • During training, practice weighing yourself before and after to get a sense of how much fluid you lose. For every pound lost, you need to drink 16 oz of fluid.
  • A pound of sweat contains about 90mg of potassium and 400 to 700mg of sodium.
  • As long as your recovery food or drink contains some salt or potassium, you don’t need anything special. One banana has 350 mg. Even foods like a cup of yogurt (520mg), large potato (800mg), cup of OJ (475mg), etc have plenty of potassium.
  • Sodium can also be found in most foods, from bagels and sandwiches to dairy and granola bars – just don’t choose low-sodium foods after the ride and you should be fine!
  • Don’t rely on sports drinks for potassium unless they specifically have it included. Check labels for sodium, as they vary.

With this recovery plan in place, you’ll be ready for another long ride in no time!

Resources

Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: Nutrition and athletic performance. J Am Diet Assoc. 2000;100(12):1543-1556.

Hargreaves M, Hawley JA, Jeukendrup A. Pre-exercise carbohydrate and fat ingestion: Effects on metabolism and performance. J Sports Sci. 2004;22(1):31-38.

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A Surprising and Delicious Recovery Drink

June 7, 2012

Whether you are racing your bike or training to ride the Menomonie Gran Fondo, as you begin to increase your amount of exercise, recovery starts to become more important.

Despite all the science that has gone into all the recovery drinks on the market, it is beginning to look like the kids favorite, chocolate milk, just might be your best option, and because of that we are excited that KEMPS low-fat chocolate milk is the “Official Recovery Drink” of the Nature Valley Grand Prix.

You might be saying, “wait a minute, chocolate milk? Really?”

But a growing body of research supports chocolate milk’s recovery benefits after strenuous exercise.  Most recently, a study published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise suggested that recovering with chocolate milk can give runners a performance edge. Researchers from Connecticut State University, University of Connecticut and Eastern Michigan University, found that when recreational runners drank fat free chocolate milk after a strenuous run, they ran 23 percent longer during a subsequent exercise bout later that day and had a 38 percent increase in markers of muscle building compared to when they drank a carbohydrate-only sports beverage with the same amount of calories. It’s also been shown to help athletes tone up gain more lean muscle and lose fat when compared to drinking a carb only beverage and contains 9 essential nutrients that an athlete needs, including some not typically found in recovery drinks.

Because KEMPS low-fat Chocolate milk contains the right mix of carbs and protein scientifically shown to help refuel muscles, it helps restore muscles quickly to their peak potential. Because of this athletes and coaches, like Nick Folker the USA Swimming Trainer and Head Strength and Conditioning Coach at the University of California, are recognizing the benefits of refueling with low-fat KEMPS chocolate milk. “It has the right carb to protein ratio scientifically shown to help the body recover, high-quality protein to help repair muscles and fluids and electrolytes to replenish what’s lost in sweat. It’s so simple, plus it tastes great!” said Folker.

Want more information on the benefits of KEMPS low-fat chocolate milk with strenuous exercise? Visit  www.gotchocolatemilk.com for additional information.

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